Sequencer Charges are military mines specially developed by Holowan Laboratories to destroy ships and facilities by targeting the vulnerable power structure. When placed precisely at key exhaust ports and power junctions, the Sequencer Charge interrupts critical regulating processes which can destabilize the core in a cascade of system failures, resulting in a catastrophic explosion. These charges can be planted offensively by raiding parties conducting boarding actions, or defensively to prevent facilities and wrecks from being captured. The intensity of the detonation can be useful for a variety of other tactical purposes as well, and these mines are frequently deployed as breaching charges to blast holes in reinforced doors or duracrete walls.

The Sequencer Charge is a seven-kilogram disc featuring a control panel on the top. The payload is a directional charge, focusing most of its explosive energy into a blast cone that extends out from the bottom of the disc. The base of the mine, often referred to as the “business end”, attaches to virtually any surface and cannot safely be removed until the mine is disarmed. A rugged durasteel casing resists tampering and abuse, and sealed internal components ensure reliable operation in a broad spectrum of environments ranging from the bottom of the ocean to the open vacuum of space. Sequencer Charges can be operated in two modes: manual and automatic. In either mode, proximity sensors prevent the mine from arming until the sapper who planted it has moved a safe distance away.

In automatic mode, the mine can be detonated by proximity or optionally by networking with other mines and being triggered by the detonation of a designated master charge. The concussive wave is deadly in enclosed spaces, and a common practice is to plant Sequencer Charges around corners where the mine cannot be observed until triggered. Some interstellar activists protest this practice, as proximity-fused mines cannot be safely approached to disarm. In manual mode, the mine can be triggered by a timer or optionally by a command signal. When a series of Sequencer Charges are set to network and blow simultaneously in what is called a “plom chain”, the master charge is typically operated in manual mode. These mines are celebrated for their versatility, sometimes planted upside down in the ground to destroy vehicles that pass over them, and even used by commercial miners seeking to pulverize difficult rock formations.

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